Avoid These 4 Common Shampoo & Conditioner Mistakes

When it comes to beauty routines, shampooing and conditioning seem as basic as they get. The facts are you're likely making mistakes while shampooing, conditioning, or both. We are going to simplify your approach to this crucial haircare routine by revealing common mistakes people make. The good news is, even if you’re making one or multiple of the following mistakes, they all come with an easy fix. So, here's how to avoid these four haircare mistakes in the future.

You Don’t Apply Conditioner Evenly

Most people apply conditioner to their palms and massage it into their hair. By doing this, you aren’t getting an even application on every strand of hair, which is important to make it softer and more manageable. Let’s not forget that even the gentlest shampoos can be drying and harsh on the hair strands. By evenly applying conditioner, you also strengthen your hair against harmful chemicals from the shampoo.  

For an even application, we recommend massaging your favorite conditioner to your hair – in our case, that would be Life’s Butter Bad Hair Day Conditioner, which is fortified with argan oil, vitamin E oil, and other nourishing ingredients. Next, use a wide-tooth comb and gently comb the product through your hair. If you have thicker hair, make sure to section it into small sections. And always comb from top to bottom.

You Don’t Choose Products for Your Hair Type

Some of the products on the market may look good and come with okay ingredients. However, if you don’t take your hair type into consideration, you won’t get good results. You may be surprised how many people purchase the wrong products. For example, someone who has fine, oily hair may pick up a haircare bundle for a completely different texture. Why? That product is popular, has better marketing, and maybe a fancier design. This is an all-too-common occurrence.

Before buying shampoo and conditioner, do your research. Learn your hair type and understand its needs. For example, coiled or kinky hair types will need moisturizing ingredients to ensure their hair is soft and manageable. On the other hand, thin hair types will need formulas that are high in protein, as this will strengthen it and prevent breakage.

Using Too Much (Or Too Little) Product

The problem here is obvious. If you apply too much of each product, you are wasting money. Nobody wants that. However, if you apply too little product, you aren’t cleaning your hair properly in the case of shampoo and you aren’t softening the hair and protecting the hair shaft from damage in the case of conditioner.

Correct this problem by knowing how much product to apply.

A good rule is to apply shampoo and conditioner the size of a nickel if you have short hair (no longer than slightly above the shoulders). If your hair is medium length (approximately no longer than past your armpits), you should apply a quarter of the product. If you have long hair (mid back and longer), use a half dollar of the product.

People have different perceptions of short, medium, and long hair, so this may be hard to gauge. This guide may be helpful:

  • Short hair: less than 12”
  • Medium hair: 12”-20”
  • Long hair: 20” and more

You Co-Wash Too Much

If you’re into the latest haircare trends, then you probably know about co-washing, aka, conditioner washing. More people are co-washing in place of shampooing because they think it’s less harmful. While you can do this on occasion, you shouldn’t go weeks without shampooing.

Conditioners have cleaning properties that can get rid of dirt and bacteria but not to the extent of shampooing. It’s important that you avoid going weeks without shampooing because you believe co-washing is doing the trick. Instead, if you are worried about your strands, we recommend shampooing your scalp only. Once you rinse your hair, the suds will gently clean your strands to help get rid of sweat, dirt, and bacteria.

You can also purchase gentler shampoos, like Life’s Butter Bad Hair Day Shampoo, which contains nourishing, antioxidant-rich ingredients.

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